Internet Explorer Pushed over the “Edge”

Microsoft’s move toward Windows 10 has gotten the attention of a lot of users and businesses alike since the beginning of 2015, with in-OS notifications of Windows 10’s launch, incentives for users to switch, often for free, and a renewed interest in Windows for the mobile device market.

Internet Explorer Pushed over the “Edge”

With this push comes the news of Microsoft moving away from Internet Explorer. Once the standard browser of the internet, IE has tumbled quite far from its place of prominence, pushed away by stronger peers in Firefox, Safari, and Chrome. Here are a few facts about the new Edge browser and the direction Microsoft is taking in the future.

Internet Explorer Pushed over the “Edge”
  • A host of problems for hosts and developers alike that are already struggling with browser compatibility for users that may be using non-Microsoft browsers. Microsoft is a heavy anchor in the enterprise technology sector, which means that there’s been considerable encouragement to make websites of all types compatible with Internet Explorer, and its legacy versions. With the removal of IE from the scene, that’s created something of a quagmire for those loyalists that believed what Microsoft was pushing.
  • Edge may compete, but… It isn’t the mobile browser of choice, nor will it be in the foreseeable future. With competitors like Google and Apple holding the power of the mobile markets, there’s been lower development focus on Microsoft products, which means that Edge may not have the social backing that it may have at one point with Internet Explorer. Instead, it will have to do battle with some of the already well established, and loved, browsers of the mobile market. Microsoft’s already been well dusted in the mobile competition arena, so it will be interesting to see how the consumer market responds to yet another attempt to capture hearts and minds.
  • Tied with Windows 10, Edge is being pushed along with the update as the OS’s built in browser, with IE now officially cast aside in favor of more modern adherence to HTML standards. Edge makes use of Microsoft’s “Trident” HTML engine, which gives it better HTML5 capabilities–, the new standard for multimedia presentation and online programming now that Flash has been considered more of a liability than an asset. That’s good news for users that just want their built in browser to work on day one, but can it convince long time users to make the switch as well? Microsoft’s previous efforts at converting the paradigm of desktop users through Windows 8’s “Metro UI” proved to be a failure.
  • Not officially down and out, Windows 10 will also include the latest version of IE11. This gives users the abilities to device for themselves which is better, but Edge will be Windows 10’s default browser. It’s easy to see that they aren’t pushing hard to try and keep Internet Explorer relevant, or at least, not as much as they used to. Likewise, there’s unlikely to be a large public outcry for a return to the browser.